Why Black Lives Matter at School Week was Important to Me?

By Milga Sharif, student at Rainier Beach High School I’m a sophomore from Rainier Beach high school. I am an African-American Muslim who has foreign parents from Somalia. As you may know, it’s black lives matter week. And since it’s that week, we must bring up topics that have been hushed from the polluted society that is our country such as young high school teens being murdered just by the way they ‘look’, ‘talk’, and the so-called way they ‘act’. Children, young adults, and families in our very own school and neighborhoods are being affected by the inhumanity caused by

Continue reading »

Graham Hill Black Lives Matter Week of Action

By Brynn Irish and Kaitlin Kamalei Jenkins, educators at Graham Hill Elementary School   Graham Hill Elementary heard about Black Lives Matter Week of Action from SEE and immediately knew we wanted to participate. As a staff, we acknowledged the importance of prepared curriculum, but also wanted to actively engage our students outside the classroom and put what they learned into action. On Monday, the BLMWoA Planning team worked with Naquaia Hall, a parent, to invite Black community leaders and parents to participate in a morning Black High Five at our main entrance. We wanted students to see our Black

Continue reading »

National Black Lives Matter at School Week: February 5-9th

By Jesse Hagopian, educator at Garfield High School A new uprising for racial justice is being organized by educators around the country who have declared February 5-9th “Black Lives Matter at School Week.”  Educators will be wearing Black Lives Matter shirts to school and teaching lessons related to the movement in cities such as New York, Chicago, Boston, DC, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Seattle, L.A., Detroit, the Bay area, and beyond. This national mobilization is a completely grassroots effort organized by educators and their social justice caucuses. They have issued three national demands for the movement: End Zero Tolerance and Implement Restorative

Continue reading »

Social Equity Educators stands in solidarity with Maru Mora-Villalpando

We are outraged at the racist attempt by the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to target Maru Mora Villalpando, a local area immigrant rights activist and leader of the Northwest Detention Center Resistance, for deportation. Maru is a tireless fighter for immigrants, their families, and the community in general. Just last year, members of SEE worked closely with Maru to lead a campaign to try and stop the deportation of Cynthia Vanessa Iraheta López, a mother of two children.   As her press release, reprinted below with Maru’s permission, states, “ICE is now purposely targeting people such as Mora-Villalpando who

Continue reading »

SEA Stands in Solidarity with the Seattle School Bus Drivers!

by Matt Maley   After a one day strike of school bus drivers on November 29, Teamsters Local 174 returned to the negotiating table with First Student, part of a multinational corporation based out of the UK that pulled in $7.1 billion in 2016¹. However, on January 6, the Teamsters rejected their next flimsy offer by 85%². Representing 400 drivers in King County, the drivers are fighting for healthcare and retirement benefits. According to the union, “fewer than 7% of First Student drivers in Seattle are covered under the Company’s health care plan”. They are willing to go out on

Continue reading »

Social Equity Educators Endorses Womxn’s March 2018

By Tracy Gill In the months after the 2016 election, people were in a state of shock wondering how things went so horribly wrong; questioning their safety and their futures in the face of an openly racist, classist, hegemonic, xenophobic, misogynistic, trans and homophobic administration. Did I leave out any “isms”? I went to my classroom the next morning in tears feeling helpless and worried for my students, almost all of whom are the targets of those “isms”. Within days, however, a movement was set into motion by a group of four amazing womxn: Tamika Mallory, Bob Bland, Carmen Perez,

Continue reading »